It’s time to draw your own conclusions.


We’re here to help you sift through the weeds.
Here are the different perspectives.
Side by side.
you decide.

 
 
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Mission

 

We're a brand new news blog as of Summer 2019 providing insight on hot issues around the USA. With growing distrust in mainstream news outlets like FOX, CNN and NBC, it's hard for Americans to decipher information. Our job is to provide the facts and arguments from BOTH the political left and right so you can create a fully informed opinion while understanding that of your neighbors. Every week we will conduct a Twitter poll accessible from our website to gauge which current issues to feature. We want to help create an informed and empathetic United States of America. Give us a follow and watch us grow. - Team LRC

 

Burning Issues

 
 
 
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Our Blueprint

 
 

One Topic. Two Columns.

The politically leaning (L)eft and (R)ight.

Understand different perspectives.

Be well informed.

 

Gun Control

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Immigration

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The Latest

 
 
 
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Sending an amped-up ICE on a mass-deportation mission wouldn’t just be an assault on undocumented people and their families, it would be an attack on American cities, where more than 90 percent of them live. For large municipalities, rigorously enforcing immigration law is unfeasible but also politically unpopular. So-called ‘sanctuary cities’ have declared their ongoing intention to drag their feet when it comes to cooperating with the Feds. For example, law enforcement in many cities (including New York) selectively complies with ICE requests to hold people in custody on suspicion of being undocumented. ICE can’t do their job without local cooperation and the use of these legally questionable detention orders has decreased by more than 70 percent in the last four years.
— Malcom Harris, Editor at The New Inquiry and author, Sep. 8, 2015
 
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Migrant children arriving in record numbers are creating challenges for school districts across the country. Many of the newcomers have disjointed or little schooling; their parents, often with limited reading and writing skills themselves and no familiarity with the American education system, are unable to help.
 
 

Timeless Perspectives

 
 
 
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Immigrants [documented and undocumented] don’t just increase the supply of labor, though; they simultaneously increase demand for it, using the wages they earn to rent apartments, eat food, get haircuts, buy cellphones. That means there are more jobs building apartments, selling food, giving haircuts and dispatching the trucks that move those phones. Immigrants increase the size of the overall population, which means they increase the size of the economy. Logically, if immigrants were ‘stealing’ jobs, so would every young person leaving school and entering the job market; countries should become poorer as they get larger. In reality, of course, the opposite happens.
— Adam Davidson International Business and Economics Correspondent at National Public Radio (NPR) Mar. 24, 2015
Sending an amped-up ICE on a mass-deportation mission wouldn’t just be an assault on undocumented people and their families, it would be an attack on American cities, where more than 90 percent of them live. For large municipalities, rigorously enforcing immigration law is unfeasible but also politically unpopular. So-called ‘sanctuary cities’ have declared their ongoing intention to drag their feet when it comes to cooperating with the Feds. For example, law enforcement in many cities (including New York) selectively complies with ICE requests to hold people in custody on suspicion of being undocumented. ICE can’t do their job without local cooperation and the use of these legally questionable detention orders has decreased by more than 70 percent in the last four years.
— Malcom Harris, Editor at The New Inquiry and author, Sep. 8, 2015
A large population of El Paso’s Hispanic population are immigrants. In fact, El Paso has one of the highest proportions of immigrants among U.S. cities. Many of these migrants are undocumented. If those who fear Mexican immigration are right, then El Paso should be a hotbed of violence. As it turns out, El Paso is one of the safest cities in the United States with a homicide rate of 2.4 per 100,000 residents. Just a tiny handful of American cities have a lower homicide rate
— Aaron J. Chalfin, PhD, Assistant Professor of Criminology at the University of Pennsylvania, May 22, 2019
Granting driver’s permits to the undocumented is in the best interest of public safety and perfectly compatible with federal law… Licenses are a privilege that all drivers, citizens and noncitizens alike, must earn. Making licensing available to every motorist who can prove driving competence reduces the number of uninsured drivers, creating more equitable insurance costs.
— Boston Globe Editorial Board, Sep. 7, 2015
 
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The economic impact of illegal immigration in the U.S. is costly and impacts the financial security of the county’s legal residents… Unregulated workers are often underpaid, which keeps wages lower in a particular occupation and region… Illegal aliens can put a financial burden on local and federal law enforcement… Immigrants on average tend to have larger families than those in the U.S. This difference can strain the resources of local school districts.
— Michael McDonald, PhD Assistant Professor in Finance at Fairfield University "10 Ways Illegal Immigration Affects You Financially" Nov. 16, 2015
Anyone who tells you that immigration doesn’t have any negative effects doesn’t understand how it really works. When the supply of workers goes up, the price that firms have to pay to hire workers goes down. Wage trends over the past half-century suggest that a 10 percent increase in the number of workers with a particular set of skills probably lowers the wage of that group by at least 3 percent. Even after the economy has fully adjusted, those skill groups that received the most immigrants will still offer lower pay relative to those that received fewer immigrants.

Both low- and high-skilled natives are affected by the influx of immigrants. But because a disproportionate percentage of immigrants have few skills, it is low-skilled American workers, including many blacks and Hispanics, who have suffered most from this wage dip. The monetary loss is sizable...
— George J. Borjas, PhD Robert W. Scrivner Professor of Economics and Social Policy at Harvard University Sep./Oct. 2016
The United States, like every developed country in the world, has immigration laws that allows for the legal entry of people who wish to come here, including – and especially – people who are seeking amnesty or asylum. Those laws should be respected by those who want to come here and must be respected by the government itself. What has been reported as happening at our southern boarder is a humanitarian crisis and needs to be addressed quickly and comprehensively.
— George Norcross, insurance executive, community non-profit leader and a Democratic Party leader in NJ